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   Table of Contents - Current issue
Coverpage
July-December 2018
Volume 16 | Issue 2
Page Nos. 39-62

Online since Thursday, July 5, 2018

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ORIGINAL ARTICLES  

Assessing the influence of mass media on contraceptive use in Nigeria: A secondary analysis of 2013 Nigerian national demographic and health survey p. 39
Joseph Odirichukwu Ugboaja, Charlotte Blanche Oguejiofor, Emmanuel Okwudili Oranu, Anthony Osita Igwegbe
DOI:10.4103/NJGP.NJGP_25_17  
Background: The low contraceptive use in Africa has been severally linked to ignorance and misconceptions. Media platforms provide potential avenues for addressing these misconceptions. This study is aimed at evaluating the influence of media exposure on contraceptive use among Nigerian women. Materials and Methods: We conducted a weighted analysis of data from the 2013 Nigerian Demographic and Health Survey that included 38,948 women aged 15–19 years using STATA software, version 12.0 SE (Stata Corporation, TX, USA) to investigate the influence of media exposure on contraceptive use among Nigerian women using logistic regression models. The result was presented in odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results: The contraceptive use among the respondents was 14.88%, comprising mainly of modern methods (64.2%; n = 3006). After controlling for age, educational status, religion, wealth status, and other potential confounding variables, the use of contraceptives was significantly associated with reading newspapers for at least once a week (OR = 1.16; 95% CI = 1.03–1.32), listening to radio for at least once a week (OR = 1.16; 95% CI = 1.01–1.32), and watching television for at least once a week (OR = 1.39; 95% CI = 1.20–1.61). There was an improvement in the odds in favor of contraceptive use among the women when the frequency of media exposure was increased to at least once a week. Conclusion: Contraceptive use among women in Nigeria is positively influenced by exposure to media which improves with increasing frequency of exposure. This finding provides a potential opportunity for improving contraceptive utilization in the country using the various mass media platforms.
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Factors associated with the use of traditional birth attendants in Nigeria: A secondary analysis of 2013 Nigeria national demography and health survey p. 45
Joseph Odirichukwu Ugboaja, Charlotte Blanche Oguejiofor, Emmanuel Okwudili Oranu, Anthony Osita Igwegbe
DOI:10.4103/NJGP.NJGP_27_17  
Background: A large number of women in Africa deliver without skilled birth attendants with profound consequences for maternal and perinatal outcomes. This study evaluated the factors associated with traditional birth attendants in Nigeria. Methodology: We conducted a weighted analysis of data from the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey that included women aged 15–49 years using STATA software, version 12.0 SE (Stata Corporation, TX, USA) to investigate the factors associated with the utilization of traditional birth attendants in Nigeria using logistic regression models. The result was presented in odds ratio and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results: The rate of delivery with Ttaditional birth attendants among the respondents was 23.4% (n = 7,267), and this was significantly associated with low maternal education (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.75;95% CI: 1.49–2.06), rural residence (aOR: 1.3 95% CI: 1.12–1.51), poor family wealth index (aOR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.09–1.54), unemployed status (aOR: 3.01; 95% CI: 1.50–6.03), and having >5 living children (aOR: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.06–1.44). Factors that significantly reduced the rate include age category 35–44 years (aOR: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.69–0.98), having visited a health facility in the past 12 months (aOR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.76–0.98), and watching television at once a week (aOR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.64–0.88). Conclusion: The risk factors for delivery with traditional birth attendants in Nigeria include low maternal education, large family size, rural residence, and noninvolvement of women in decision about their health care while exposure to media and contact with a health facility reduced the risk. Women empowerment through education and employment may reduce the rate of use of traditional birth attendants at delivery.
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Predictors of poor perception of women's use of contraceptives among Nigerian men: A national survey p. 53
Joseph Odirichukwu Ugboaja, Charlotte Oguejiofor Blanche, Emmanuel Okwudili Oranu, Anthony Osita Igwegbe
DOI:10.4103/NJGP.NJGP_28_17  
Background: Men's poor perception about the use of contraceptives has been linked to their lack of support for the use of contraceptives by women. This study aims to study the predictors of poor perception of women's use of contraceptives among Nigerian men. Methodology: We conducted a weighted analysis of data from the 2013 Nigerian Demographic and Health Survey that included 17,359 men aged 15–19 years with STATA software, version 12.0 SE (Stata Corporation, TX, USA), using multiple logistic regression models. Results: Poor perception of women's use of contraceptives was found in 38.2% (n = 6609) of the men. Men who perceive contraception as entirely women's business (odds ratio [OR] =8.08; confidence interval [CI]: 7.02–9.29), knew about contraceptives (OR = 2.73; CI: 1.65–4.02), did not listen to radio (OR = 1.71; CI: 1.43–2.04), and were currently unemployed (OR = 1.53; CI: 1.04–2.27) were more likely to have a poor perception on contraceptives. Significant reduction in likelihood for poor perception of women's use of contraceptives was found among respondents who, in the preceding months, heard about family planning on radio (OR = 0.86; CI: 0.75–0.97), read about family planning in the newspapers (OR = 0.85; CI: 0.72–1.00), discussed about family planning with a health-care worker (OR = 0.72; CI: 0.59–0.88), and allows the wife/partner a greater say in matters concerning her healthcare (OR = 0.62; CI: 0.47–0.83). Conclusion: Perception of contraceptive as an entirely women's business, poor exposure to media, and not allowing the women have a say in health-care matters were the key drivers of poor perception of contraceptive use among men.
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Recurrent nephropathy among immunocompromised persons could warrant BK polyomavirus testing p. 61
Idris Abdullahi Nasir, Halima Ali Shuwa, Hafsat Saidu Isiaka
DOI:10.4103/NJGP.NJGP_1_18  
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